Dealin’ with the Winds!

Winds are finally subsiding this week. Although the winds have hampered fishing in many areas, adjusting to the elements is key to finding fish and staying safe in the process. Kingfish and mackerel are here, and the lighter winds will allow boaters to troll nearshore wrecks and reefs looking for baitschools getting attacked by birds. Slow trolling live threadfins or sardines can often locate areas where the kings are holding. After a few bites, anchor and begin chumming with cut baits and a chum bag. Cast out flatlines with lightwire and a 2/0 – 3/0 live bait hook, then wait for kingfish and mackerel to hit. This method works really well, bringing the fish to your location. Snook, redfish and trout are the main focus for inshore fishing. Snook are making their way to the passes and nearby beaches. Numbers will continue to increase over the next few weeks as the days stay warm and the winds decrease. Early in the spring, less wary snook explode on handfuls of chummed sardines, giving up their location. If fishing in current, always cast uptide and allow the bait to drift naturally to the fish. Trout are holding in the same locations as the snook along the beach cuts and rocky structures. Redfish are responding best around the stronger moon phases, schooling along the mangroves on the higher tides. Mullet schools have also held larger reds. Gold spoons worked through large mullet schools will get chased and hit by these big reds. A few mid slot fish will be caught as well.

Capt. Brian

Hello Warm Days!!

A warming trend has triggered the fish in north Pinellas. As usual for this time of year, the trout bite has been phenomenal on the warmer days once they are located. Although tides have been a bit weak, the bite has occurred best around the turn of the high tides. The higher outgoing waters pull the warm water from the shallow flats, prompting the fish to eat well. Large live shrimp under a cork or freelined in the deeper waters have produced several trout. The overall size and amount of trout is less than years past, so persistence and patience is key to locating a group of cooperating fish. Long casts are vital to keeping a school in one place. Drifting quietly or using a trolling motor on low speeds will increase success when moving around. Redfish are showing up well in the usual spots. Mangrove shorelines, oyster bars and potholes on the flats at low tides. Docks are also holding several fish in the lower slot range. Cut baits, shrimp, and rootbeer colored jigs are working well. Snook reopened in the Gulf of Mexico waters on March 1st. Although a few have been caught along the north coast, they are still a little wary, not stimulated to eat as often in the cooler waters. As soon as the sardines show up again, the snook will bite will turn on after being dormant through winter.

Capt. Brian

Typical Weather Patterns!!

Hello everyone! Thank you for reading my fishing report. We are slowly but surely getting through the winter months here in Florida. We are in the typical roller coaster of weather patterns. High winds and cold days has kept us off of the water a bit, however the warmer days are productive and fish are being caught. The usual suspects are spotted sea trout and redfish. For fun, rodbending action, ladyfish and jacks are also getting hooked. Sheepshead are being targeted along the seawalls, docks and oyster bars in the backcountry areas offering a little more warmth. Live shrimp is the main bait we are using as well as jerkworms and paddle tail jigs while targeting the trout in St. Joseph Sound. The spring months are right around the corner and as usual I am getting flooded with calls for bookings. Don’t hesitate to get your special day booked. Call me at 727-365-7560 or e-mail me at brian@captbrian.com. I look forward to hearing from my regulars and new clients throughout the spring! Let’s go fishing!

Capt. Brian